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    Walt Shakes

    Walter Ude (@Walt_Shakes) is an award-winning Nigerian writer, poet and veteran blogger. He is a lover of the written word. the faint whiff of nature, the flashing vista of movies, the warmth of companionship and the happy sound of laughter. He blogs at mymindsnaps.wordpress.com.

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GRIM HELPER (Ward Rounds: Episode 5)

His gloved hands dripped with blood, blood from the uterus now open before him.

“I conquered it! Yes, I did!” he exulted. His voice easily sent a shudder down a listener’s spine. “I did it, I did it! I did it!” he chanted again.

***

My scalpel is razor sharp, its beauty gleaming in the overhead bulb. My confidence, it soars, as the cold metal touches my double-gloved hand.

What those sadistic consultants didn’t let me do, I do today, no restraints whatsoever.

My hand is steady and quick as I slice into the gravid abdomen. I hear my heart beat calmly: lup dup, lup dup. I realise I am in control of the situation.

The incision, it is white at first. Looking closely I see clusters of yellow fat, but red fluid soon spills out.

 *

Bunch of nervous wrecks, all of them, whining like hungry mosquitoes:

“Be careful of the incisions you use.”

“Lower uterine segment incision is better than classical, it gives her an opportunity for a VBAC.”

“Always secure haemostasis before you continue, she’ll bleed out if you don’t.”

“Green armittage is the choice instrument.”

“Local anaesthesia is preferred.”

“Don’t ever attempt a myomectomy during a C/S.”

Don’t do this, don’t do that. Who are they to tell me what to do, when to do it and how to do it?!

It is bad enough they order me around in medical school. I only endure because I have a License to get. Now everyone calls me Doctor, they want to control me too?

Never, never, never!!

 *

The red fluid is making my incision ugly. I secure a few bleeders, not because of the ‘nervous people’s whine’, but because I have to see where next to cut.

I cut further until I reach the uterus. I make no attempt to secure more bleeders. I make a small cut and separate the muscle. A small nick on the sac, and out comes the amniotic fluid.

The man I hired to double as anaesthetist and nurse speaks. I do not hear him. He shouts and I still do not hear him. I admire my work with full concentration. I think he says something like this: “Chief, do something about the bleeding! The pulse is becoming fast and thready!”

But I still do not hear him. The things I do next are a blur, as I bring out the baby, alive and shrieking.

It’s a boy.

I give the baby to the hireling. He has a look on his face that suggests I am crazy.

But I am not crazy, I am a Helper. I stare again at the bloodied uterus as I think: I did the caesarean section all by myself!

The surgery is long over now. Only the child makes it, but I admire my bravery, at least I save one. My thoughts embolden me as they float around in my mind: Who says I am a danger to these patients? Out here in a bush village in Bornu state, where service to the nation threw me, I offer myself and my services to people who would not have help otherwise. I charge cheaply even. I lack finesse, I know. I do better at butchery than surgery, I know. My thoughts amuse me. Still I am the one who stayed when others ran from the bombs and killings. I risk my life and stay. No one dares point an accusing finger. Look around, I am the only medical help available for miles.

***

His eyes stared far into the horizon as he sat in front of the bungalow that housed his ‘clinic’. An expression of indifference is plastered on his face. Another mortality has been registered, but it did not make a difference to him. He was practicing his art, ‘collateral damage’ he often called it.

Written by Aida Scribbler6372860-a-medical-doctor-performing-surgery-on-a-patient

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27 Comments

  1. Sallie

     /  September 27, 2013

    God forbid!!

    Reply
  2. tokoni

     /  September 27, 2013

    Now dis is one scary story and I’m pregnant ATM. … Chai not my portion.

    Reply
  3. Wow. Really impressive work.

    Reply
  4. Graphic detail of a sadistic doctor with a demented mind.

    Reply
  5. Aida, could you have saved the mother? Made me sad…. Too much blood yet u lost her. *crying*

    Reply
  6. doris

     /  September 27, 2013

    JEEZ! Please walter,don ‘t write this kind of story again.

    Reply
  7. kachi

     /  September 27, 2013

    Beautiful 🙂

    Reply
  8. nik

     /  September 27, 2013

    ohh the demented look focused on only the baby, not caring what happens to the mother. who cares he is the only doc around, he can get away with it.
    the cracken has been released (heheheh)

    Reply
  9. em. shakes, shey no be series cause I don’t think I would like to read this type of stories again. scared already

    Reply
  10. make I go read am from episode 1. fear is a thing of the mind

    Reply
  11. Tosin

     /  September 27, 2013

    Nyc one u av here….lluv d details…..n for d doctor….!!!!….He nids help…..I pirri his “victims”…..I obviously cnt kal them Patients….

    Reply
  12. Ok. Nice story. The problem were with details.
    First, pfannenstiel incision is a skin incision and different from classical, which is the incision on the uterus.
    What he meant to say was a lower segment incision was better than a classical because it makes VBAC possible.

    Second, you don’t make an incision on the placenta to release the amniotic fluid. It’s the amniotic sac that is incised. The placenta is then delivered after the baby has been delivered.

    The doctor is definitely crazy. He definitely knew what to do but chose not to just because he didn’t want to be told what to do…now that is a whole different level of crazy.

    Reply
  13. Great work by Adaora, as usual.

    @topazo- I think that the point of the story is to show a ‘quack doctor’, one who doesnt actually have the skills to do what he claims to do.

    And the sad thing is that if you check it out, we probably have A LOT of these ‘doctors’ around in Nigeria.

    Reply
    • Very sad indeed. Aηd becos Nigeria isn’t a litigious country, their incompetence is constantly kept from tнє knowledge of tнє public. Wнєη there aяє no lawsuits of wrongful deaths, there’s no awareness of malpractice

      Reply
  14. anderson

     /  September 27, 2013

    My take? Dis guy needs a two-week long session with Manny! He’s wacko.

    Reply
  15. Grace oruitemeka

     /  September 27, 2013

    Walter na! I hate stories wit gory details…i dnt av a stomach 4 it…u knw am a SOFTIE..lol

    A cwazi doc I mst say…i pray he dosnt cm 2 d south…phew!..way to go AIDA..

    Reply
  16. abikoye

     /  September 27, 2013

    Humanity turned collateral damage
    I say this Doc needs a shrink.

    Reply
  17. nice story biko! Ride on AIDA

    Reply
  18. chika

     /  September 27, 2013

    Chei! Scary stuff here

    Reply
  19. Adeline Kasper

     /  September 29, 2013

    Rotfl!
    Lol!! =))
    Nice story. It just made me lol, cos d doc himself is a patient.He nids help 😀

    Reply
  20. The grimness of the story and edgy sadism are determinants of this story’s pulse. Yet something makes it beat rather faint – the narrowed perspective of the Surgeon’s view. A different voice – not self-absolved – may have promoted the amorality and the recklessness of the procedure making this read less cold. There is a lone voice on isles where evil thrives – a hegemony that haunts. There is a sleepless dark in this story. I am quite afraid of it.

    Reply
  1. ACCIDENTS DO HAPPEN (Ward Rounds: Episode 6) | MY MIND SNAPS

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