‘Science’ is the word of the year, according to Merriam Webster Dictionary

article-2517564-19CE61A100000578-896_634x428‘Selfie’ may have been named word of the year by Oxford University Press last month, but today, Merriam-Webster announced ‘science’ to be their word of 2013.

The publisher of Oxford dictionaries tracked a huge jump in overall usage of selfie (“a qualitative selection meant to embody a shift in culture,” according to Time), but Merriam-Webster stuck primarily to look-ups on its website, recording a 176 percent increase for science when compared with last year.

Which means lots and lots of people looked up the definition of “science” this year. Who is looking up the definition of science this much though?!?

Last year’s winner was a tie between socialism and capitalism. That makes sense enough to me. The year before was pragmatic. Hey, people might not know the definition of pragmatic. I’m OK with that. Some runners up for Word of the Year include cognitive, rapport, niche, visceral and communication. These are words you may not know. These are words that can be explained with a single definition. Except communication, you should probably already know that one.

But science? Who is looking up the definition of science?!

“The more we thought about it, the righter it seemed in that it does lurk behind a lot of big stories that we as a society are grappling with,” M-W president and publisher John Morse explained. “Whether it’s climate change or environmental regulation or what’s in our textbooks.”

Which, sure. But that seems more like something you would Google. This is the definition of science. Not the arguments of science versus faith. Not the concepts behind different types of science. Just what the word science means.

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines science as:

sci·ence noun \ˈsī-ən(t)s\

: knowledge about or study of the natural world based on facts learned through experiments and observation

: a particular area of scientific study (such as biology, physics, or chemistry) : a particular branch of science

: a subject that is formally studied in a college, university, etc.

Is this new information to anyone? Oh well, if you really want your mind blown, look HERE at the comments people have left on M-W’s science definition.

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